Skip to main content

About your Search

English 26
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
cannot segregate jobs by gender. in 1964 civil rights act outlawed it. judy was absolutely fabric ousted. they called the equal opportunities employment commission in washington and find it. so the next day she dialed the eeoc in washington and the woman said yes, that's legal. and she said i don't think the men know it's illegal. [laughter] she said why don't we just tell them? and the woman said, are you crazy? she said people in power don't want to give up power. they will promote -- she said to have a very clear case. you have to sue. so now judy had a moral issue. it wasn't just she wasn't being promoted, it was this is an illegal thing. and one by one she started talking to her friends. i was the fifth person that she spoke to. and we decided because we were terrified that we would be fired if anybody found out, that we each of us would talk to one other person who did talk to one of the person. and where do we organize? in the ladies room. that plays have tears in the organization. and so, we want by one got to be about 20 women on the staff when we realized we needed on the large
. she has dedicated her life -- her grandfather really worked hard for civil rights in texas when she was growing up. he fought the plan will heart out there. so when my mother was -- he fought the klan out their real hard. so when my mother was in europe, she fought for the gypsies. for life. that is why she took me to haiti. she believes very much in the flag of equality in all things. and cornell west is her great hero. tavis: so you mentioned your daughter maya who is now 14. who is an artist in her own right. so it is not just navigating being a parent. your a show-biz guy who has a daughter who is already in show biz. how're you navigating that? and you perform with her. i saw that thing on youtube. >> what do you do with the kid? she said that whole thing up. kids are not like little puppies that you can control and have them do everything. she writes songs and she sings songs and she believes and herself. i was doing explores. i am not in the position to tell her she cannot be an artist. i am in a position to tell her that i do know a little something about how to have a meani
, history of labor in the 20th century, one of the great triumphs of the civil rights era was for people to recognize -- for white labor to recognize that as long as black laborers were excluded from unions they were undercutting white labor as well. >> it took a while. >> it did. it took 60 years actually. so when you see this kind of cynical advertising, they're trying to use that same ploy using african-americans. and if we had any doubt about the inter-related struggles, let's look at this one issue. how many times have we seen politicians get into trouble because they had nannies who were not being paid or being paid under the tashlgs being exploited. if we look back, we don't have to go to hollywood, we don't -- >> go home. >> look back to the history. half a century ago, that exploited domestic labor would have been black women. >> that's right. >> these are the same struggles. >> absolutely. i so appreciate that. that's part of why next i get to talk about the smartest thing i have read about black folks and the presidency of president obama in four years. we're going to talk abo
is gone. it may never be seen again in the history of civilization and it's stored right here. without the voice of the cameras they would really have no voice and these landscapes would just disappear and nobody would be the wiser. it would be as if a tree fell in the forest and no one was there to hear the sound. it's the exact same conundrum. if a glacier melts in the arctic and there's no camera there to see it did it ever really exist? did it ever really happen? well, the cameras give life and voice to those processes and places. the scientific language that this story is told in is profoundly, profoundly, profoundly important. and it's what we build the pictures on. so i don't want to forget that. but then when you stack the visualization on top of the scientific understanding and then you marry those two things together, the art and the science, and you have something really powerful. >> when i saw the nasa satellite imagery of greenland i thought -- i honestly thought, "why doesn't jim balog let nasa do it? he doesn't have to take the risk anymore. this technology's doing what
be seen again in the history of civilization and it's stored right here. >>> james balog has come here from iceland and alaska with some urgency because what he has to tell us, barack obama and mitt romney simply refuse to talk about. welcome, james balog. >> i'm glad to be here, thank you. >> i've read the science on climate change. and then i read your book and saw your film and suddenly i more than get it. it gets me. does that make sense to you? >> yeah, it does. and that's the same reaction we've heard from many, many, many people across all parts of the philosophical and political spectrum. it really is this convergence of art and science that i think really hits people. and yeah, to be honest with you, having learned about these kind of sciences back when i was in my 20s, i tried to forget about the sciences for many decades. and i went off and saw the world as a visual artist. and then in this project i came back and really infused the science back into my thinking about, thinking and feeling about the world as an artist. and it turned out that this combination of art and scien
into consideration as argument of>c[0 civil rights against an individual. falsely as it turned out later]ij1u of raping a young woman with a coke bottle in the st. francisúc hotel which ruined his career. is it a spectacle we crave in i> strongly suspect that should ross regains+íhl his elected position that san franciscans will be given a spectacle of7ñm, a long and hard working -- to show himself at the hel&m%sh mp of these issues with personal integrity and that is something which i submit we ei-are sorely in need of in this town. thank you9 p. >> well, i've been praying that i6g the lord would have me say the right words here and i've heard a lot of good speeches tor l. the best was that asian lady with the massage. that was a good÷Ñjpv one. this is totally reinstate him, give him double back pay and it's!z!/ all right. you should believe his wife also. okay? believe his wife. now -- and also i think the sheriff should go in there and sit down and dare anybody to arrest him, because he has been elected. the mayor has no auth
in the united states was the freedom rides. the beginning of the civil rights movement. people in washington dc, they wrote into the south where was segregated and they refuse to follow the laws. they were very brave. so i have a character, a young man who was on that bus. and his mother says system, those people are going to kill you. and he discovers that she is right, they really do want to kill him. i'm sure many people in the audience will remember that in the younger people will have heard of it anyway. tremendously dramatic. and i found out about this stuff, it's still moving. encourage the people who had studied the notion that if you are attacked, unjustly attacked, the best thing to do is to do nothing. some of these people just, you know, stood there were laid bare and took the punches and kicks. i have found it is strictly moving to read about this stuff. and i'm hoping that i will be able to, you know, bring that to millions of people. >> in some ways, that is like the lloyd george thing. they show what it really is. >> that's exactly right. that was their theory. and it's a good t
against the 1957 civil rights bill. we remember in today as one of the last of the jim crow demigods, and he was. he was that. he was one of the last to be what we forget is that he was also one of the first of the sun belt conservatives. what do i mean by that? well, the sun belt, it's one of the major stories in the history of 20th-century american politics. that is, the flow of jobs, of industries, of resources and population from the states of the northeast and the midwest to the south and the southwest in the post-world war two timeframe. southern states were recording industries. passing right-to-work laws, receiving lots of funding from the federal government to build military installations a time when the united states was involved in the cold war is the soviet union. so states like mississippi, georgia, texas, florida, southern california, arizona, north carolina, of being transformed in the post-world war two to and from five this historic shift in population and political influence. just think about it. really from 1964-2008, it could be thought of as the sunbelt dominance
earlier this week a muslim civil rights group has launched a counterad campaign showing a quote from the koran that says, show forgiveness. speak for justice and avoid the ignorant. the council on islamic relations says the new ads send a positive message. the controversial pro israel ads compare muslim extremists to savages and are responsible for the initiative. >>> expect delays for track work this weekend. trains will single track along two sections of the red line between robener and twin brook and trains will also share the track between fort to theon and prince george's county plaza on the green line. everything should be back to normal by monday morning. >>> the time is 6:37. a maryland teen bullied and humiliated on camera is in the news this morning. >> next, what he did last night that got classmates and his community behind him. >>> an unforgettable moment for a virginia teen at his high school home coming game. how his story brought many tears. you're watching news 4 today. take away his toys and he'll play with a stick. take away their bikes and they'll still find a way
employers and he listed his jobs as constitutional law professor and civil rights attorney. he described his work as talked a lot, wrote a memoir about my identity crisis. he was also little sketchy about the years 1985 through 1987, saying it was hard to remember who he actually worked for. but he did say he was a community organizer and his job description was described as organizing people and to train people to organize. for education, he listed occidental college, columbia university, and harvard law. listed his grades is not available. his interests were basketball, marxist literature, writing about myself, talking about myself, making money, and saving the world. and the mainstream media fell in love with this highly qualified applicant. they fell in love with him because they liked the trifecta of the first black male liberal president. it didn't hurt that he went to the college is that the mainstream media adored. sarah palin attended all kinds of colleges, she was a sportscaster, helped her husband, became mayor, and one becoming the first woman to serve as government in the state'
israel ads at metro stations as a muslim civil rights group is set to unveil a counterad. these new ads show a quote from the koran that says, show forgiveness, speak for justice, and avoid the ignorant. the council on american islamic relations says these new ads send a positive message. the controversial pro israel ads compare muslim extremists to savages and are sponsored by the american freedom defense initiative. >>> a heads up now for metro riders. expect some delays this weekend for track work. the red line is going to have two portions single tracking. they are going to be between grovener and twin brook and then between noma-gallaudet and fort totten. trains will also share the track between fort totten and prince george's plaza on the green line. everything should be back to normal by monday morning. >>> right now we want to take you live to los angeles. we head over to the west coast where the shuttle "endeavour" continues to slowly move as it travels to the california science center. late last night the process was delayed for a few hours as crews prepared for it to cross a
with add missions policies. as the court has interpreted title vi, the civil rights act of 1964, the private universities have to follow whatever the supreme court says with respect to public universities. and so this is often misunderstood as only affecting public universities. but title vi leverages the effect of this to private universities as well. >> everyone gets affected ultimately. good to see you. thanks for coming in. >> thanks for having me. >>> in our next hour former ohio congressman dennis kucinich joins me live. we're going to talk about cutting entitlements while ensuring the survival of medicare. ase in clinical depression. drug and alcohol abuse is up. and those dealing with grief don't have access to the professional help they need. when you see these issues, do you want to walk away or step up? with a degree in the field of counseling or psychology from capella university, you'll have the knowledge to make a difference in the lives of others. let's get started at [ laughing ] [ laughing ] [ laughing ] [ laughing ] ♪ >>> welcome to "weekends with
universal rights and freedoms including 4 women. the united states made it clear we would be watching closely and would assess the government by its actions, not its words. this past february, students and civil society activists shared with me their fears about extremists seeking to derail their transition and lasting democracy but also their hope that responsible leaders and accountable institutions would be strong enough and willing enough to turn back that challenge and indeed we have seen an intense debate play out in tunisian society. for example, early drafts of the new constitution labels women as complementary to men, but to nietzsche's active civil society raised strong objections and eventually the national constituent assembly amended to recognize women's equality. society is wise to remain vigilant and exercise their hard-earned rights to safeguard their new democracy. like the hundreds of tunisian women who recently took to the streets to protest on behalf of a woman charged with indecency after she was raped by a police officer. these competing visions of tunisia's futu
and by the way the civil rights act secured passage for it but democrats have co-opted that narrative and we have got to seize control of that so when black republicans come out and say hey, you know, i'm exercising my first amendment right, we get slammed. we get put back in what i call the black box. and, you know what? i never read the black memo that said i have to be a democrat and it's -- >> -- it's crazy. >> i didn't get that one. >> crystal rice thanks so much for coming in and sharing your experience about. this we appreciate it more "fox & friends" in a few minutes. bp has paid over twenty-three billion dollars to help people and businesses who were affected, and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open for everyone to enjoy -- and many areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. we've shared what we've learned with governments and across the industry so we can all produce energy more safely. i want you to know, there's another commitment bp takes just as seriously: our commitment to america. bp supports nearly two-hundred-fifty thousand jobs in communit
's equality. civil society is wise to remain vigilant and to exercise their hard-earned rights to safeguard their new democracy. like the hundreds of tunisian women who recently took to the streets to protest on behalf of a woman charged with indecency after she was raped by a police officer. these competing visions of tunisia's future were put to the test. violent extremists attacked the u.s. embassy in tunis and burn the american school nearby. how did the good the tunisian people in government respond? first, the government increase increased security around our embassy and promised to assist with repairs to the school, which they have done. then they publicly committed to confront violent groups and prevent tunisia from becoming a safe haven for international terrorism. following through on these pledges is essential. those responsible for the attacks must be brought to justice. the government must provide security for diplomatic missions and create a secure environment for foreign residents and visitors, and the rule of law must extend to everyone throughout the country. the country's
stayed in the background. but she was out front. you know, a champion of women's rights, a champion of trying to create civil society organizations although there were tied to the government and not really dependent. nothing much is independent. the profile of her just before the uprising. they called her the rows of the does of something, the desert rose, which they were very embarrassed about. that is what one of the questions, where has that person gone. people had high hopes. and that is one of the saddest things about that because they really did develop a level of popularity in the country that was not insignificant. difficult to gauge popularity because sometimes the people come out in support of. [indiscernible] they don't want to be seen as not supporting the government's. the security sources all-around. it's rather difficult to see how genuine and sincre this popularity is, but having defended the country quite a bit and gone around, all sorts of people, i really did cents a genuine popularity. for me personally that's one of the saddest things about that. implement a tru
to recognize women's ecology. civil society is wise to remain diligent and exercise their hard-earned rights to safeguard there new democracy. like the hundred destination women who recently took to the streets to protest on behalf of a woman charged with indecency after she was raped by police officers. these competing visions of tenacious future were put to the test when violent extremist attack to the u.s. embassy and burned the american school nearby. how did the to the sinn people and government respond? first, the government increased security around our embassy and promised to assist with repairs to the school which they have done. they publicly committed to confronting violent groups to prevent tunisia from becoming a safe haven from international terrorism. following through is essential. those responsible must be brought to justice. the government must provide security for diplomatic missions and create a secure environment for foreign residents and visitors. the rule of law must extend to everyone throughout the country. the country's leaders took to the airwaves, newspaper, faceb
in the middle east. up next, the talks about syria's civil war, iran's nuclear program. my interview with the republican presidential nominee continues right after this. ♪ ♪ ♪ we're lucky, it's not every day you find a companion as loyal as a subaru. love. it's what makes a subaru, a subaru. perform, compete and grow. and people are driving this change. that's the power of human resources. the society... for human resource management and its members know... how to harness that power, because we help develop it. from the next economy, to the next generation, we help get... the most out of business, by getting the best out of people. shrm. leading people, leading organizations. >>> more now from my interview with republican presidential nominee mitt romney. i asked him about the very dangerous didn'tments taking place in the middle east right now. >> in syria you said you would identify members of the opposition and ensure they obtain arms to defeat al assad's tanks. how do you make sure those weapons don't get into the hands of terrorists or al qaeda? >> well, wolf, this is part
germany, the building was converted and use for civil defense purposes and left to deteriorate further. you could do something with it if you have 5 million euros to spare, and just as importantly, the right idea. real-estate agent cornelia shell specializes in selling properties like these. some potential buyers seem to have rather unrealistic notions. >> people frequently tell me they would like to have a spacious home. when i want it might be a bit too spacious, they add that they were thinking about bringing it along their mother-in-law as well. imagine -- that is around 2000 square meters. you do not have to use it all, but at least 1000 square meters on the ground floor and first floor. that is the equivalent of at least five single-family dwellings. and you have to be able to pay for the maintenance of all of that. >> she has now found a credible potential buyer, but it is all about location. >> often, they are not in the right surroundings. for example, if a park has been partly turned into allotments, or if there is it that founding built nearby, which is a growing problem, th
family. my parents are irish immigrants my dad's a civil engineer. and when my mom was pregnant with me, my dad decided, "let's go to san francisco for a year, get a job," and my mother... c-span: right from ireland. >> guest: straight from ireland, from county cork. it used to sound very romantic to me. now it sounds really impulsive. my mom had one child at that point, so they went for what was going to be a year and they ended up staying there. they're still there. my mom fell in love with california and... c-span: how many kids in the family? >> guest: six -- five girls, one boy. c-span: and then where did you go to college? >> guest: i went to college at berkeley, which is across the bay from where i was raised. my step-daughter's is there now c-span: studied what? >> guest: i studied rhetoric and economics. i started out being an economics major because i thought i wanted to go to law school, discovered, in fact, that i really loved the study of rhetoric, which is one of the the most ancient faculties, and decided to just do both. c-span: and how did you get to the washington post
are already sending americans but fewer of them. >> that's right, we're sending in more afghans to do the job. afghans to do the job. >> let's move to another war, the civil war in syria. where there are estimates that more than 25,000, 30,000 people have now been killed. in march of last year president obama explained the military action taken in libya by saying it was in the national interest to go in and prevent further massacres from occurring there. so why doesn't the same logic apply in syria? >>s it's a different country. it is five times as large geographically. it has one fifth the population that is libya, one fifth the population, five times as large geographically. it's in a part of the world where they are not going to see whatever would come from that war, it has seep mood a regional war. are you in a country that is heavily populated in the midst of the most dangerous area of the world. and, in fact f, in fact t blows up and the wrong people gain control, it's going have impact on the entire region causing potentially regional wars. we are working hand and glove with the turks,
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)